Waterfalls and More Prints

In the Field 2014

About an hour further up the same rocky, steep creek trough (at one point our hiking incorporated some rock climbing, sans ropes, up along the side of a small waterfall), Tony spotted a cache of prints along the bottom side of a bedding plane next to another waterfall.


In the Field – making molds of a duckbill foot from Perot Museum on Vimeo.

Perot Museum curator of Earth Sciences and paleontologist, Dr. Fiorillo and professor Yoshi Kobayashi making molds “In the “Field”.


The location was difficult to get to not only because the slope was so steep, but also because the ground in this area was a mixture of rocks and sediment. Finding a foothold was precarious at best; it felt like any movement created an instantaneous (thankfully minor) rockslide.

But Tony and Yoshi found a way to get to the tracks and again documented the find with measurements and photos.  This time they also took a mold of the most pronounced specimen.

 

Difficulty finding a foothold

Difficulty finding a foothold

Tony and Yoshi navigating to a possible track site

Tony and Yoshi navigating to a possible track site

Tony and Yoshi making their way to the tracks

Tony and Yoshi making their way to the tracks

Tony and Yoshi documenting the find

Tony and Yoshi documenting the find

The view from this location was breathtaking. We were now at about an altitude of about 5000 feet. The wind had kicked up and it was chilly but it was still sunny. I bundled up just in case.

View from 5,000 feet

View from 5,000 feet



Posted from Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, United States.